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Month: November 2010

Guest Alice Eve Cohen on
The Occupational Hazard of Memoir Writing

Guest Alice Eve Cohen on
The Occupational Hazard of Memoir Writing

[Alice Eve Cohen is a memoirist, solo theater artist, and playwright. Her memoir, What I Thought I Knew (Penguin), won Elle Magazine’s Grand Prix for Nonfiction, and Oprah Magazine’s 25 Best Books of Summer. She teaches at The New School in New York City. And, in today’s guest post, Alice shares what is probably the most difficult part in writing about one’s life.] THE OCCUPATIONAL HAZARD OF MEMOIR WRITING STEP ONE: Write your memoir… STEP TWO: Confess to your husband…

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Ann Wertz Garvin and On Maggie’s Watch

Ann Wertz Garvin and On Maggie’s Watch

After reading The Revealing of Ann Wertz Garvin, and the guest post, Private Parts, it would be safe to expect the unexpected from Ann Wertz Garvin and her debut novel On Maggie’s Watch. Of course, for this author, the unexpected is a very good thing as Ann confesses: “Writers are observers and I’m the noisiest observer there ever was.” Noisy? Actually it’s being curious and having the zest for life to explore all types of interests. For example: Ann’s background…

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The Revealing of Alice Eve Cohen

The Revealing of Alice Eve Cohen

In July, 2009, playwright and theater artist Alice Eve Cohen added author to her roles when What I Thought I Knew: A Memoir was published. Now, out in trade paperback, the memoir is described in the following sentence: In her unflinchingly honest and ruefully witty voice, Alice nimbly carries us through her metamorphosis from a woman who has come to terms with infertility to one who struggles to love a heartbeat found in her womb – six months into a…

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Guest Ann Wertz Garvin on Private Parts

Guest Ann Wertz Garvin on Private Parts

[In Best Writing Exercises, Part V, Ann Wertz Garvin (On Maggie’s Watch) explains: “I like to take a phrase that strikes me as interesting or funny–something I’ve seen on a bumper sticker or heard in conversation–and figure out what is funny about it and what it relates to.” In today’s guest post, the author does just that and more.] Private Parts My writer’s notebook in my satin evening bag sits untouched. I stand apart from the polished, pore less, people…

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James King and Bill Warrington’s Last Chance

James King and Bill Warrington’s Last Chance

Although his journey to publication took more than 30 years, James King reached his destination — not only by becoming an Amazon Breakthrough Winner — but by writing his debut novel Bill Warrington’s Last Chance about the journey of life. The author, a corporate communications writer by day and aspiring novelist by night, had three unpublished novels in his desk drawer when he was inspired to write the character of Bill Warrington based on a neighbor/friend who had passed away…

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Best Writing Exercises, Part V

Best Writing Exercises, Part V

In The Divining Wand’s seemingly never-ending pursuit to discover how our favorite authors/friends perfect their natural skills, they were asked: What have been some of the best writing exercises you’ve used in your writing process? This week’s responses suggest that less is best. Also please welcome another new author, Meg Mitchell Moore! Beth Hoffman (Saving CeeCee Honeycutt): “None, really.” Karen McQuestion (A Scattered Life, Easily Amused, and Celia and the Fairies for ages 7 – 11): “I tend to be…

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The Revealing of Ann Wertz Garvin

The Revealing of Ann Wertz Garvin

Ann Wertz Garvin made her debut only two weeks ago with On Maggie’s Watch, a novel described in this one sentence: Unexpectedly compelling and sparkling with wit and intelligence, this debut novel chronicles one woman’s quest for control over her surroundings, and the secrets and surprises that lie hidden in an ordinary suburban landscape. And bestowed with this praise: “On Maggie’s Watch shows how we thrive, how we go on, in a life that’s neither perfect nor fair. Ann Wertz…

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Guest James King on
How to Talk to a Debut Novelist

Guest James King on
How to Talk to a Debut Novelist

[After a journey to publication that took over 30 years, James King finally saw his first novel, Bill Warrington’s Last Chance, on bookstore shelves in late August. It’s a proud, personal success and, in today’s guest post, he explains what a debut novelist appreciates most from family, friends, and (potential) readers.] How to Talk to a Debut Novelist First-time novelists tend to be a sensitive sort. Getting published is often a lifetime dream come true, realized after years of solitary…

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Richard Doetsch and
The Thieves of Darkness

Richard Doetsch and
The Thieves of Darkness

Well before gaining recognition for his clever, backward tale of The 13th Hour, Richard Doetsch had established a reputation for inspired writing with The Thieves of Heaven and The Thieves of Faith — both featuring reformed thief Michael St. Pierre. And, in the author’s latest thriller, The Thieves of Darkness, this unique anti-hero returns — not necessarily to save the world — but to save those he loves. As with any genre, there are thrillers and then there are quality…

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