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Archive for May, 2010

Allison Winn Scotch and The One That I Want

May 31, 2010 By: larramiefg Category: Book Presentations, Books


Allison Winn Scotch (New York Times Bestseller, Time of My Life, The Department of Lost and Found) launches her third novel, The One That I Want, tomorrow — June 1, 2010. And once again the question of “what if?” becomes the tagline for the book.

The backstory for The One That I Want is best described as “the bookend” for Time of My Life. In other words, after writing about “what if?” you could go back and change the past, the author decided this book would be “what if? you could see the future and either accept or change it. Acknowledging that she wanted to continue in the same vein because it felt like readers were responding/relating to the concept, Allison also says:

“I really enjoy writing these wish fulfillment types-of-books, but I didn’t want to do anything even remotely like TOML out of fear that people would think that was all I had in my arsenal. And also, of course, to challenge myself: I try to push myself with each book. So I aimed to take everything about TOML and flip it, while still keeping true to who I am as a writer, as well as the themes I like to explore about pursuing a bigger, more fleshed-out life.”

Indeed the writer succeeded because The One That I Want isn’t remotely similar to its predecessor, in fact it might even better! Why? How? Well carefully consider the synopsis:

What if you woke up one day to all your dreams coming true…but those dreams were more like nightmares?


Tilly Farmer is thirty-two years old and has the perfect life she always dreamed of: married to her high school sweetheart, working as a school guidance counselor, trying for a baby. Perfect.



But one sweltering afternoon at the local fair, everything changes. Tilly wanders into a fortune teller’s tent and meets an old childhood friend, who offers her more than just a reading. “I’m giving you the gift of clarity,” her friend says. “It’s what I always through you needed.” And soon enough, Tilly starts seeing things: her alcoholic father relapsing, staggering out of a bar with his car keys in hand; her husband uprooting their happy, stable life, a packed U-Haul in their driveway. And even more disturbing, these visions start coming true. Suddenly Tilly’s perfect life, so meticulously mapped out, seems to be crumbling around her. And as she furiously races to keep up with – and hopefully change – her destiny, she faces the question: Which life does she want? The one she’s carefully nursed for decades, or the one she never considered possible?



What if you could see into the future? Would you want to know what fate has in store?

Now read an excerpt, Chapter One.

And finally take note of the Reviews, including:

“An aching, honest look into the death and rebirth of relationships. Scotch answers hard questions about the nature of personal identity and overwhelming loss with a wise, absorbing narrative.” – Publishers Weekly

“Scotch specializes in heroines at a crossroads, questioning their life choices and preparing to embark on journeys of self-discovery. . . . [She] creates eminently relatable characters, with a particularly excellent understanding of the way sisters interact, and has the ability to craft scenes of real emotional weight.”- Booklist

“Well-told . . . a good choice for fans of women’s fiction and book clubs. It’s fast-paced and feels light yet still packs a satisfying emotional punch.” – Library Journal

These are glowing words for a book of substance. It’s true that in Time of My Life Jillian had problems of emotional weight with which to contend and she tried to solve them by escaping back into the past. But, in The One That I Want, Tilly is literally and figuratively stuck in the present with the clarity of how her past has — and will continue — to affect the future. There’s no escaping for her, only decisions to be made about “what next?”

In last week’s post, Guest Allison Winn Scotch on Scoring Your Goal, the author wrote, “….striving toward goals – both big and small – is an underlying theme of my new book.” Further adding: “My heroine, Tilly, had aspirations for herself – maybe not to light the world on fire, but enough to light her inner-self on fire, and somewhere along the way, she loses these aspirations, without even recognizing that she’s done so.”

Although Tilly Farmer is only thirty-two, she comes across as older and settled with the only goal in her sight — having a baby. While that is the dream/goal of countless women, a baby for Tilly would mean she had achieved her perfect (and rather safe) life. For this protagonist doesn’t take chances. She married her high school sweetheart, chose a stable career as a guidance counselor, and returned to her high school to advise students of their future, bemoaning that most are anxious to move out of the small town.

Tilly thinks she’s happy. Even Allison was initially fooled until she “found” out how much anger the character had. Between the compromises that she’d been forced to make, the decisions that she’d never had the chance to opt for, and a future filled with watching over others, Tilly doesn’t dare to dream BIG. Because, if she does, her illusion of safe happiness falls apart.

After completing The One, the author mentioned in a blog post that there would be fans who wouldn’t like this more serious, darker storyline. How unfortunate. Because TRUTH: Allison soars in telling a multi-layered, complex story of real people with real problems who need to find real goals/dreams to enjoy happiness. The writing is brilliant and carries not a trace of Allison’s own voice — a personal goal she had set for herself.

This writer is known to be “the real deal” as a person. With this third novel, Allison Winn Scotch becomes “the real deal” to critics, fans, and new readers. The book is The One That I Want and you can have it too…tomorrow!

Book Giveaway: The Divining Wand is giving away one copy of Allison Winn Scotch’s The One That I Want in a random drawing to anyone who comments only on this specific post. Comments left on other posts during the week are not entered into the contest. The deadline is Wednesday, June 2, 2010 at 7:00 p.m. EDT with the winner to be announced here in Thursday’s post. If you enter, please return Thursday to possibly claim your book.

The Revealing of Carey Goldberg, Beth Jones and Pamela Ferdinand

May 27, 2010 By: larramiefg Category: Profiles


Successful journalists — Carey Goldberg, Pamela Ferdinand, and Beth Jones (pictured left to right) — are the co-authors of Three Wishes: A True Story of Good Friends, Crushing Heartbreak, and Astonishing Luck on Our Way to Love & Motherhood.

This collaborative memoir is the uplifting true story of three best friends who transformed their lives by taking motherhood into their own hands. And these glowing reviews explain more:

“…like The Sisterhood of the Traveling Pants for adults. Lots of women out there will want to read this book.” (Library Journal, Barbara Hoffert)

“The book is a riveting account of their journey to motherhood, which takes some unexpected twists and turns…” (Ladies’ Home Journal)

“This true story is a love story—but not a typical one….Though the idea that the “magical” sperm holds the power to transform each woman’s life is a little far-fetched (and the authors do acknowledge this), the book’s message is pretty good: when you decide to pursue your dreams, good things will find a way of happening.” (Woman’s Day)

“Three Wishes…is an incredibly wise, witty and powerful memoir written by three brave and accomplished women who had the desire to be mothers—each one, on her own terms. On their shared journey to becoming mothers, they forged an incredible sisterhood that speaks to the importance of friendship in women’s lives and shows how empowering friends can be.” (Irene Levine, The Huffington Post and Psychology Today)

The Divining Wand has scheduled a presentation/review of Three Wishes (could there be a more appropriate book and title featured on this site?) for Monday, June 14, 2010 but today let’s meet the authors through their “official” bios:

Carey Goldberg has been the Boston bureau chief of the New York Times, Moscow correspondent for the Los Angeles Times, and most recently a health and science reporter at the Boston Globe. She now writes happily at home.

Beth Jones is a freelance writer and educator who has contributed to the Boston Globe, the New York Times, and numerous academic journals. She plans to climb many more frozen waterfalls.

Pamela Ferdinand is an award-winning freelance journalist and former reporter for the Washington Post, Boston Globe, and Miami Herald. She remains an incorrigible romantic.

And now it’s a pleasure to learn more about each one in the revealing Q&A:

Q: How would you describe your life in 8 words?

A: Pamela: A beautiful adventure and unpredictable work-in-progress.

Carey: Full, and fascinating — at least to me.

Beth: Simultaneously predictable and spontaneous, which is great.

Q: What is your motto or maxim?

A: Pamela: Do what you love, and everything else follows.

Carey: The currency of love is time.

Beth: Keep your eyes open, there’s a lot to see.

Q: How would you describe perfect happiness?

A: Pamela: Simplicity. Being in my fiance’s arms. Holding my daughter in mine.

Carey: Attainable only in brief moments.

Beth: Being outside with family and friends on a 74 degree day while the rest of the world is at peace, too.

Q: What’s your greatest fear?

A: Pamela: Losing someone I love. Or being lost to them.

Carey: Harm to my children.

Beth: Danger or harm to my child.

Q: If you could be anywhere in the world right now, where would you choose to be?

A: Pamela: Hiking in New Zealand.

Carey: In an alpine forest.

Beth: It’s Saturday morning, my son’s in the bathtub, the sun is shining, the sky is blue, I can hear birds and we’re going to go hang signs for a yard sale. Right here is fine. Somewhere in Yosemite would be great, too.

Q: With whom in history do you most identify?

A: Pamela: Explorers and female writers, including Rebecca West for some things: her intellectual curiosity, love of travel, writing, and independence. (But not for other things, including her troubled relationship with her son.)

Carey: Women; refugees; writers.

Beth: My grandmother, who knew that we often need to fight for what we want, but that grace can be a part of our struggles.

Q: Which living person do you most admire?

A: Pamela: Anyone who helps someone in need without being asked.

Carey: My dad.

Beth: An San Su Kyi

Q: What are your most overused words or phrases?

A: Pamela: Lately, “What do you say?” to my toddler as we encourage her to say “Please” and “Thank you”

Carey: “Lovely”

Beth: “Cool.” “What?”

Q: If you could acquire any talent, what would it be?

A: Pamela: To sing. On key.

Carey: Math.

Beth: Singing well.

Q: What is your greatest achievement?

A: Pamela: My daughter, though her achievements will be hers alone.

Carey: My whole written oeuvre and, to the extent it can be called my achievement, my family.

Beth: Optimism.

Q: What’s your greatest flaw?

A: Pamela: Impatience, impatience, impatience.

Carey: Impatience? Laziness? There are so many to choose from!

Beth: Envy.

Q: What’s your best quality?

A: Pamela: Maybe that I wouldn’t say I have a “best” anything.

Carey: Perhaps some kind of emotional fluency?

Beth: Humor.

Q: What do you regret most?

A: Pamela: That I didn’t find Mark earlier.

Carey: Not having more time with my mother.

Beth: Losing my temper.

Q: If you could be any person or thing, who or what would it be?

A: Pamela: Anything in my daughter’s orbit.

Carey: A blossoming tree.

Beth: A superhero who could help save the world and stop big businesses like BP from doing such stupid things.

Q: What trait is most noticeable about you?

A: Pamela: My laugh has been compared to a pig hunting for truffles.

Carey: Frequent smiling?

Beth: Independence.

Q: Who is your favorite fictional hero?

A: Pamela: Curious George, at the moment

Carey: Meg in a “Wrinkle in Time”

Beth: Elizabeth Bennett, “Pride and Prejudice”

Q: Who is your favorite fictional villain?

A: Pamela: The Wicked Witch of the West

Carey: “It” in a “Wrinkle in Time”

Beth: George Hustwood from “Sister Carrie”

Q: If you could meet any athlete, who would it be and what would you say to him or her?

A: Pamela: Olga Korbut. “What is your most treasured memory as a young gymnast?”

Carey: I just don’t speak Sports!

Beth: Billy Jean King. “How did it feel when you knew you’d beaten Bobby Riggs?”

Q: What is your biggest pet peeve?

A: Pamela: In the small picture, people who toss cigarette butts out of car windows. In the big picture, a lack of generosity of spirit.

Carey: Gratuitous meanness in any context.

Beth: Mean people.

Q:What is your favorite occupation, when you’re not writing?

A: Pamela: Being a mom, potter, and traveler.

Carey: Exploring in any form.

Beth: My old job, teaching stress resiliency to kids and teachers.

Q: What’s your fantasy profession?

A: Pamela: Author. This is it.

Carey: I wish I could wave a wand and be great at Information Technology.

Beth: Being a writer who knows that millions of people will read what I write, and while my writing will elicit controversy, it will always be enjoyed.

Q: What 3 personal qualities are most important to you?

A: Pamela: Integrity, compassion, and an open heart.

Carey: (no answer)

Beth: Honesty, humor, deep ability to love.

Q: If you could eat only one thing for the rest of your days, what would it be?

A: Pamela: Depends — either fresh fruit or coffee ice cream.

Carey: Salad (really! but with yummy dressings…)

Beth: Fruit and vegetable salad

Q: What are your 5 favorite songs?

A: Pamela: This is nearly impossible for me. I live in the city with the world’s greatest radio station – WXRT – and began in radio myself. I love music as much as books. But forced to answer, my favorite songs would include:
1. Boston: Peace of Mind
2. Rickie Lee Jones: We Belong Together
3. David Bowie: Life on Mars?
4. Billy Joel: Summer Highland Falls
5. New Order: True Faith
(runner-ups: Chaka Khan “Ain’t Nobody”; Dire Straits “Telegraph Road”; Bruce Springsteen “The River”; Rolling Stones “Beast of Burden”; Tom Petty “American Girl”; and Tori Amos “A Sorta Fairytale”; The Who “Baba O’Riley”)

Carey:
1. “You Me and the Bourgeoisie” by the Submarines
2. “Feeling Groovy” by Big Jim’s Ego
3. “Who Knows Where The Times Goes” by Judy Collins
4. “Falling Slowly” from the movie “Once”

Beth:
“Space Oddity” by David Bowie
O-o-h Child by The Five Stairsteps
“Good Day Sunshine” by The Beatles

Q: What are your 5 favorite books of all time?

A: Pamela: I hate to play favorites, but some of the books I keep going back to are:
“Romeo & Juliet” by William Shakespeare
“The Lord of the Rings” by J.R.R. Tolkien
“Mrs. Frisby and The Rats of NIMH” by Robert C. O’Brien
“The Amazing Adventures of Kavalier & Clay” by Michael Chabon
“The Selected Poetry of Rainer Maria Rilke”

Carey: Too hard!! But I’m in the phase of rereading old favorites to my children, and have recently discovered or rediscovered:

“The Phantom Tollbooth” by Norton Juster
“James and the Giant Peach” by Roald Dahl
“A Wrinkle in Time” by Madeleine L’Engle
and the newer “If I Reach You” by Rebecca Stead.

Beth:
“Sister Carrie” by Theodore Dreiser
“Of Men and Fire” by Norman Maclean
“Busy, Busy World” by Richard Scarry
“Love Poems” by Pablo Neruda
“Collected Poems” by James Wright

To learn more about Three Wishes and its authors, please visit the book’s website. Also, for current news regarding these three friends, please follow Pamela on Twitter and become a friend on Facebook.

* * * * *

Announcement: The winner of Barrie Summy’s I So Don’t Do Makeup is Julie@my5monkeys.

AND

Colleen Turner is the winner of Emily Winslows’s The Whole World.

Congratulations! Please email: diviningwand (at) gmail (dot) com with your mailing address, and the book(s) will be sent out as soon as possible

The Revealing of Allie Larkin

May 26, 2010 By: larramiefg Category: Profiles

There’s great buzz about Allie Larkin and her debut novel, STAY, releasing June 10, 2010. And why not with this appealing description (from the Advance Uncorrected Proofs back cover):

Something Borrowed meets Must Love Dogs in a big-hearted, unforgettable debut about friendship, love, and a German Shepherd named Joe.

Literary critics agree:

“A charming debut…. Smart and with emotional depth, this is a cut above.” —Kirkus Reviews

“Larkin debuts with a funny and touching story about love, loss, and dog ownership.”– Publishers Weekly

The Divining Wand has scheduled a presentation/review of Stay on Tuesday, June 9, 2010 but — as is tradition — let’s meet Allie through her “official” bio:

Allie Larkin lives in Rochester, New York, with her husband, Jeremy, their two German Shepherds, Argo and Stella, and a three-legged cat. She is the cofounder of The Greenists.com, a website dedicated to helping readers take simple steps toward going green. Stay is her first novel.

Hmm, interesting…but it’s time to discover what else Allie might reveal:

Q: How would you describe your life in 8 words?
A: Full of friends, dogs, books, blogs and love.

Q: What is your motto or maxim?
A: Be kind.

Q: How would you describe perfect happiness?
A: I find a lot of happiness in the imperfect.

Q: What’s your greatest fear?
A: Jello. No, not really, but the way it moves weirds me out.

Q: If you could be anywhere in the world right now, where would you choose to be?
A: I would love to get to hang out with all my far away friends, but the where doesn’t matter all that much.

Q: With whom in history do you most identify?
A: I think any writer feels some connection to the writers who came before them.

Q: Which living person do you most admire?
A: My husband.

Q: What are your most overused words or phrases
A: Oh! I have the “like” and “um” disease. Trying so hard to break it.

Q: If you could acquire any talent, what would it be?
A: I am quite possibly the world’s worst dancer. It might be nice to be less embarrassing in that capacity.

Q: What is your greatest achievement?
A: Having a marriage that nurtures personal growth and creativity. STAY is very much a product of my husband’s belief in me and his endless support.

Q: What’s your greatest flaw?
A: I wear my heart on my sleeve.

Q: What’s your best quality?
A: I care.

Q: What do you regret most?
A: I regret little things – drinking one too many cups of coffee, not going for a run last night – the big stuff is just a chance to learn and do better next time. I’ve learned too much from my mistakes to regret them.

Q: If you could be any person or thing, who or what would it be?
A: I’ve always wanted to be a mermaid.

Q: What trait is most noticeable about you?
A: My hair has a life of it’s own.

Q: Who is your favorite fictional hero?
A: Pippi Longstocking

Q: Who is your favorite fictional villain?
A: I really like grey characters – the ones who aren’t quite good and aren’t quite bad.

Q: If you could meet any athlete, who would it be and what would you say to him or her?
A: I don’t really follow sports, but maybe a question about what it felt like to not get picked last for kickball in grade school?

Q: What is your biggest pet peeve?
A: Burp talking. Go ahead and burp, but keep the alphabet to yourself, please.

Q: What is your favorite occupation, when you’re not writing?
A: Spending time with my husband. The world is a better place when he’s around.

Q: What’s your fantasy profession?
A: This one. 🙂

Q: What 3 personal qualities are most important to you?
A: Compassion, humor, patience

Q: If you could eat only one thing for the rest of your days, what would it be?
A: Haddock. And no, I’m not joking.

Q: What are your 5 favorite songs?
A: Yellow Brick Road – Kris Delmhorst, On the Way Up – Peter Mulvey, One Wind Blows – Toad the Wet Sprocket, Peace of Mind – Boston, Hannah & Gabi – The Lemonheads

Q: What are your 5 favorite books of all time?
A: Song of the Lark, The Bean Trees, Of Mice and Men, Little Women, The Ordinary Princess

With a delightfully fresh voice filled with wit and charm, Allie Larkin is a new author to follow on Twitter and become friends with on Facebook. By doing so, you can say: “I knew her when…”

* * * * *

Book Giveaway: The Divining Wand is giving away one copy of Emily Winslow’s
The Whole World in a random drawing to anyone who comments only on this specific post, Presenting Debutante Emily Winslow and The Whole World. Comments left on other posts during the week are not entered into the contest. The deadline is tonight, May 26, 2010 at 7:00 p.m. EDT with the winner to be announced here in tomorrow’s post. If you enter, please return tomorrow to possibly claim your book.

AND

Book Giveaway: The Divining Wand is giving away one copy of Barrie Summy’s
I So Don’t Do Makeup in a random drawing to anyone who comments only on this specific post, Barrie Summy and I So Don’t Do Makeup. Comments left on other posts during the week are not entered into the contest. The deadline is tonight, May 26, 2010 at 7:00 p.m. EDT with the winner to be announced here in tomorrow’s post. If you enter, please return tomorrow to possibly claim your book.

Guest Allison Winn Scotch on Scoring Your Goal

May 25, 2010 By: larramiefg Category: Guest Posts

[Are you on the path to leading the life you want by setting goals or merely dreaming? In today’s guest post, Allison Winn Scotch (New York Times Bestselling Author of Time of My Life, The Department of Lost and Found), shares the direction she took to professional dreams, then goals, and why her new main character needs a wake-up call to discover The One That I Want — coming June 1, 2010.]

One of the questions I’m most often asked, now that I’m fortunate enough to earn my keep as a novelist, is, “Did you always want to be a writer,” and I always feel a little awkward answering that because my answer isn’t a definite yes. I feel like, as fortunate as I am, shouldn’t I have been striving toward this goal with every fiber of my being since I was a kid? I mean, let’s be clear: there are folks out there who feel that way, who would chop off a finger to be a published author. So when my cheeks redden a little at this question, that’s why – I love this job and part of me always hoped to do it, but it was one of several aspirations I had for myself, not the only one.

The reason I even raise this confession is because striving toward goals – both big and small – is an underlying theme of my new book, The One That I Want, and in writing it, I was able to give a lot of time and focus as to my own goals, and to what those goals have been throughout my life. And it also made me realize how easily these goals are thrown off-track. My heroine, Tilly, had aspirations for herself – maybe not to light the world on fire, but enough to light her inner-self on fire, and somewhere along the way, she loses these aspirations, without even recognizing that she’s done so. And while I didn’t relate to Tilly on a lot of levels, I can see how easily our hopes for ourselves slip through our fingers without even noticing it.

I’m lucky: I’ve always been fairly bullheaded and with a maiden name like Winn, I grew up in a household where my father’s frequent question was “What’s your last name?,” to which I’d begrudgingly answer “Winn” and role my eyes. But the lessons were there: he taught me not to compromise, to raise the bar high. Still though, when I graduated from college and had not one clue what to do with my life, my parents urged me to become an investment banker, like my older brother. I dragged my heels and made my rounds of interviews but knew a small part of me would die if I had to wake up and put on a suit and analyze numbers every day. I wanted to be an actress, wanted to sing, perform, and yes, write, as I’d done for my college newspaper and throughout my life, but making a living as a writer seemed, well, IMPOSSIBLE, and having graduated from an Ivy League school, making a living as an actress seemed irresponsible somehow, so I compromised and got a job in PR.

I lasted eight months. And then I quit to pursue acting anyway.

That day, when I went into my boss’s office and gave notice, that spark, that fire was reborn, the one that extinguished in Tilly. Quitting was exhilarating, I could literally feel it in my blood, that I was going to chase my dream despite the fact that all logic dictated otherwise. I won’t bore you with the details of how I got from there to here, but taking that first step – recognizing that tuning into my goals – was critical. (Or tuned into my dreams – I do think there’s a difference, and one that I realized eventually: goals are pragmatic, whereas dreams are less so…a conclusion I definitely came to when I finally opted to stop acting.) But back to my story of when I was 23: I was doing it -I was pointing myself in the direction of the life I wanted to lead, and that’s all I could ask of myself. Really, I think that’s all anyone can ask of themselves. It’s all that I wanted Tilly to ask of herself too, and without revealing too much, eventually, she realizes that we’re all worthy of looking toward our goals, whether they’re to be a New York Times bestselling author or to be able to run a 5k without stopping. The small goals can accumulate and result a big goal: living the life you hoped for. I’m still tweaking – I think we’re all still tweaking – but I think half the battle is being aware of your goals and that setting them for yourself is critical. Small ones, big ones, just put them out there for yourself, and then, ready, set, go.

* * * * *

Book Giveaway: The Divining Wand is giving away one copy of Emily Winslow’s
The Whole World in a random drawing to anyone who comments only on this specific post, Presenting Debutante Emily Winslow and The Whole World. Comments left on other posts during the week are not entered into the contest. The deadline is Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 7:00 p.m. EDT with the winner to be announced here in Thursday’s post. If you enter, please return Thursday to possibly claim your book.

AND

Book Giveaway: The Divining Wand is giving away one copy of Barrie Summy’s
I So Don’t Do Makeup in a random drawing to anyone who comments only on this specific post, Barrie Summy and I So Don’t Do Makeup. Comments left on other posts during the week are not entered into the contest. The deadline is Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 7:00 p.m. EDT with the winner to be announced here in Thursday’s post. If you enter, please return Thursday to possibly claim your book.

Presenting Debutante Emily Winslow and
The Whole World

May 24, 2010 By: larramiefg Category: Book Presentations, Books, Debs


With a BFA in acting from Carnegie Mellon University’s elite drama conservatory, and an MA from Seton Hall University’s Museum Professions program, Emily Winslow adds novelist to her professional background when her literary mystery, The Whole World, debuts tomorrow May 25, 2010.

And the title of novelist may be the most personally rewarding for this member of The Debutant Ball (Class of 2010 ) who moved to Cambridge, England three years ago. Although her husband grew up in the city, Debutante Emily was a foreigner fascinated by “the most physically exquisite places” to which she’s ever been. Further describing Cambridge as “rich with honest, passionate, unsnobbish intellectual curiosity,” she suddenly found words for her new home and created an American protagonist to describe and explain it. Which is is how the novel’s backstory came to be:

Two American girls come to study at Cambridge University. They become best friends, they fall for the same charming grad student…and he disappears.

About the “missing student?” Emily admits, “it’s just one of my favorite plots. It’s a fascinatingly awkward situation for the other characters. How long to keep hoping? When to choose to
grieve?”

She also explains the major theme, format and title of her mystery:

“You know how someone says ‘”That means the whole world to me.”‘ Maybe they’re talking about a job, or a romance, or some kind of victory or achievement. That one fraction of life feels to them to be bigger than everything else, and that skew can lead to poor judgment and disproportionate reactions. I have five narrators sharing the plot, but each of them has only their own small ‘”whole world”‘ fraction of it, limited by their obsessions, assumptions and expectations.”

In The Debutante Ball’s April 5, 2010 post, Backstory Feast, Emily details the goal of backstory for her narrators by writing:

“THE WHOLE WORLD begins with a narrator struggling to get past memories that actively get in her way. For the first two chapters, we watch her struggle against these invisible enemies. Finally, in chapter three, she’s forced to confront them. Only then, when she stops resisting, is the reader let in on what those memories specifically are. Their release into her present consciousness is as present an action as anything physical that had come before.

My hope is to show how the past affects the present for all the characters, how it informs their choices and skews their perspectives.”

Indeed this literary mystery is a first-rate psychological drama that initially has the reader wondering “what happened?” and then eventually “whodunnit?”

From the book jacket:

At once a sensual and irresistible mystery and a haunting work of rich psychological insight and emotional depth, The Whole World marks the beginning of a brilliant literary career for a superb, limitlessly gifted author.

Set in the richly evoked environs of Cambridge, England, The Whole World unearths the desperate secrets kept by five complex people–students, professors, detectives, husbands, mothers–secrets leading to explosive consequences.

Two Americans studying at Cambridge, Polly and Liv, become quick friends, strangers to their new home, survivors of past mistakes. They find a common interest in Nick, a handsome, charming, seemingly guileless graduate student. For a time, the three engage in harmless flirtation, growing closer while doing research for Gretchen Paul, the blind daughter of a famed novelist. But betrayal, followed by Nick’s inexplicable disappearance, brings long-buried histories to the surface.

The investigation raises countless questions, the newspapers report all the most salacious details–from the crime that scars Polly’s past to the searing truths concealed in the photographs Gretchen cannot see. Soon the three young lovers will discover how little they know about each other, and how devastating the ripples of past actions can be.

Would you like a sneak peek into The Whole World? Please read the first page.

For years Emily Winslow wrote logic puzzles for Games magazine, embedding traditional logic into longer and more complex stories. And her debut mystery novel might well be thought of as one jigsaw puzzle pieced together by the five narrators. Occasionally their perspectives overlap in the present time yet the key factor here is that their pasts don’t.

Are there red herrings? Not really, but there are secrets along with evasive behavior. The charm of this story is that it’s set in the elegantly described confines of Cambridge — another whole world unto itself. There, five other whole worlds meet and collide based on almost inevitable, personal motivation. It’s logical yet surprising and, in the end, shocking.

Perhaps the book’s most fascinating aspect is realizing that what happens in The Whole World could happen anywhere at any time…and does. For each individual views their respective circumstances and personal priorities as the whole world — and it’s not.

Intriguing, thought-provoking and entertaining, Debutante Emily Winslow’s literary take on The Whole World is available tomorrow. Do read it to discover how slices of life become entangled to complicate the world as a whole.

Book Giveaway: The Divining Wand is giving away one copy of Emily Winslow’s
The Whole World in a random drawing to anyone who comments only on this specific post. Comments left on other posts during the week are not entered into the contest. The deadline is Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 7:00 p.m. EDT with the winner to be announced here in Thursday’s post. If you enter, please return Thursday to possibly claim your book.

AND

Book Giveaway: The Divining Wand is giving away one copy of Barrie Summy’s
I So Don’t Do Makeup in a random drawing to anyone who comments only on this specific post, Barrie Summy and I So Don’t Do Makeup. Comments left on other posts during the week are not entered into the contest. The deadline is Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 7:00 p.m. EDT with the winner to be announced here in Thursday’s post. If you enter, please return Thursday to possibly claim your book.

Barrie Summy and I So Don’t Do Makeup

May 20, 2010 By: larramiefg Category: Book Presentations, Books


For all tween mystery fans, Barrie Summy (I So Don’t Do Mysteries, I So Don’t Do Spooky) has put Sherry (short for Sherlock) Holmes Baldwin back out in the world, to solve her THIRD mystery in I So Don’t Do Makeup.

Readers can expect two differences — one minor, one major — in this book with the first being that the mystery is introduced almost immediately. According to the author, “this is one of the great things about writing a series! Readers know the characters and expect a certain voice. In this case, they expect a mystery. So, the writer gets to jump right into the thick of things more quickly.”

And that’s exactly what Sherry does EXCEPT this time (major difference) she’s not using her detective skills to help her mom — a policewoman, who died in a drug bust well over a year ago, and is now a member of the ghost patrol watching over the real world. On the contrary, Mom urges Sherry to stay away from this mystery but, alas, even “spirit” Moms have only so much control. Besides, Sherry and her friends have been innocent victims of this crime.

To better understand, here’s the synopsis:

This third mystery about fast-thinking sleuth Sherry Holmes Baldwin is perfect for tweens and teens who love investigating with heroines they can relate to.

What’s better than a sleepover? A sleepover with makeovers! Sherry and her friends have an awesome time with eye shadow, glitter, and more hair products than a salon. But when the girls wake up the next morning with serious skin issues, Sherry is freaked. Someone must have tampered with her makeup!

It turns out that the mall’s cosmetics kiosk has had lots of products returned by upset customers. Sherry is determined to get to the bottom of things. After all, she’s a bit of a crime-solving celebrity (well, at least in the spirit world). Ghost academies around the world are impressed by Sherry’s and her ghost mom’s skills.

And if anyone can solve a mystery involving mascara, it’s Sherry Holmes Baldwin.

Now view I So Don’t Do Makeup book trailer that showcases the storyline.

What Barrie Summy has done in this book is to have Sherry and her friends put aside their differences to work toward a common goal of solving the crime! Indeed they use their common sense, research and technological skills, along with bravery and commitment, in order to succeed. Talk about empowerment and enhancing preteen self-concepts…not only for Sherry, but for her fans!

The author admits she admires Sherry’s tenacity, especially when things don’t come easily for her, the character refuses to give up. As a Mother of four children, however, Barrie knows even the best child isn’t perfect. In fact she’s not afraid to reveal Sherry’s flaws — a few being a lack of preparation for schoolwork combined with a degree of thoughtlessness for a teacher. As an adult this scene upset me, while the author hopes it makes young readers “feel a little uncomfortable and encourages them to evaluate their own behavior in a similar situation.”

The bottom line is that as much fun, character-building, and outwitting adults scenarios as there are in these tween mysteries, there are also important lessons to be learned. Well beyond the glitter and glamour products of I So Don’t Do Makeup is a basic wholesome tale of preteens respecting the value between right and wrong, then doing their best to have justice served.

I So Don’t Do Makeup is available now and by remembering last week’s post, Guest Barrie Summy and Her Middle Grade School Fans, both girls and boys love this series…especially during summer vacation days!

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Book Giveaway: The Divining Wand is giving away one copy of Barrie Summy’s
I So Don’t Do Makeup in a random drawing to anyone who comments only on this specific post. Comments left on other posts during the week are not entered into the contest. The deadline is NEXT Wednesday, May 26, 2010 at 7:00 p.m. EDT with the winner to be announced here in NEXT Thursday’s post. If you enter, please return NEXT Thursday to possibly claim your book.

The Revealing of Allison Winn Scotch

May 19, 2010 By: larramiefg Category: Profiles

The ever popular Allison Winn ScotchNew York Times Bestselling author of Time of My Life and The Department of Lost and Found — is less than two weeks away from the release of her third novel, The One That I Want, available on June 1, 2010.

This highly anticipated book has been described by Allison as a “bookend” to Time of My Life which was based on the premise of “what if” you could go back and change your past. The One That I Want flashes forward with the question:

What if you woke up one day to all your dreams coming true…but those dreams were more like nightmares?

And literary critics are more than impressed, here’s one review:

“An aching, honest look into the death and rebirth of relationships. Scotch answers hard questions about the nature of personal identity and overwhelming loss with a wise, absorbing narrative.” – Publishers Weekly

The Divining Wand has scheduled a presentation/review of The One That I Want for Monday, May 31, 2010 yet — for now — let meet this talented, contemporary fiction writer by reading her “official” biography:

Allison Winn Scotch is the bestselling author of Time of My Life and The Department of Lost and Found. Prior to her fiction, she was a frequent contributor to numerous magazines and websites including Cooking Light, Family Circle, Fitness, Glamour, and Redbook, and now focuses on celebrity profiles for a variety of magazines. She lives in New York with her family.

And now for much more personal insights as Allison reveals:

Q: How would you describe your life in 8 words?
A: Fulfilling. Hectic. Blessed. Hilarious. Exhausting. Content. Striving. Loved.

Q; What is your motto or maxim?
A: If you asked me what I came into this world to do, I will tell you, I came to live out loud. – Emile Zola.

Q: How would you describe perfect happiness?
A: Kisses, success, hugs, confidence, joy in my children, nine hours of sleep.

Q: What’s your greatest fear?
A: Losing one of my kids or having something harmful come their way.

Q: If you could be anywhere in the world right now, where would you choose to be?
A: Paris. Or Anguilla.

Q: Which living person do you most admire?
A: My 3 year old daughter. Sheer, naked confidence.

Q: What are your most overused words or phrases?
A: “I’m going to count to three. One…two…”

Q: If you could acquire any talent, what would it be?
A: Incredible guitar skills.

Q: What is your greatest achievement?
A: Raising children who cherish their independence and are bolstered by their self-confidence.

Q: What’s your greatest flaw?
A: That I am too independent.

Q: What’s your best quality?
A: My optimism.

Q: What do you regret most?
A: No regrets. Ever.

Q: If you could be any person or thing, who or what would it be?
A: Myself. Really.

Q: What trait is most noticeable about you?
A: My petiteness: my avatars must add six inches to me online. (I’m short!)

Q: Who is your favorite fictional hero?
A: Annie (Little Orphan) — she’s spunky, entrepreneurial, smart, loyal and stands up for herself.

Q: If you could meet any athlete, who would it be and what would you say to him or her?
A: Andre Agassi. I had a raging crush on him as a teenager which has evolved into a hearty and well-deserved respect as an adult.

Q: What is your biggest pet peeve?
A: Irresponsibility.

Q: What is your favorite occupation, when you’re not writing?
A: Celebrity interviewer.

Q: What’s your fantasy profession?
A: Rock star.

Q: What 3 personal qualities are most important to you?
A: Kindness, intelligence, empathy.

Q: If you could eat only one thing for the rest of your days, what would it be?
A: Chocolate. Chocolate. Chocolate. Oh, also, maybe some bread. So chocolate-filled bread?

Q: What are your 5 favorite songs?
Read My Mind by the Killers, Throwing It All Away by Genesis, The Long Way Round by The Dixie Chicks, Time by Chantel Kreviazuk, Let the River Run by Carly Simon. (But that’s for today. I could go on with this forever.)

Q: What are your 5 favorite books of all time?
A: Then We Came to the End by Joshua Ferris, Good Grief by Lolly Winston, The Dive from Clausen’s Pier by Ann Packer, The Stand by Stephen King, The Help by Katherine Stockett

Allison Winn Scotch loves the social media and has proven that the past four years with almost daily posts on her Blog: Ask Allison. Visit her there, follow her on Twitter and friend her on Facebook. Because, since her optimism, humor, and sound advice are contagious, she’s likely to be the one that you want…to get to know even better.

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Book Giveaway: The Divining Wand is giving away one copy of Thaisa Frank’s
Heidegger’s Glasses in a random drawing to anyone who comments only on this specific post, Thaisa Frank and Heidegger’s Glasses. Comments left on other posts during the week are not entered into the contest. The deadline is tonight at 7:00 p.m. EDT with the winner to be announced here in tomorrow’s post. If you enter, please return tomorrow to possibly claim your book.

Guest Emily Winslow’s Open House

May 18, 2010 By: larramiefg Category: Guest Posts

[As Emily Winslow awaits the launch of her debut novel, The Whole World on May 25th — one week from today –, she reflects on her journey, mixed feelings, and the fact that it is a celebration and you’re invited to the party.]

Getting past the query stage to agency representation, and then a book contract, is huge. I’ve reveled in the relief and then security of those milestones. But there are other kinds of rejection ahead: reviews and sales. Essays and blog posts aimed at aspiring writers have become meaningful to me again, now that my book is about to launch.

An old favorite is Slushkiller by Teresa Nielsen Hayden, which gives an editor’s view of rejection. To the writer, rejection is personal and bloody. To the editor (or agent), it’s necessary, impersonal, and fleeting. The wording in form letters is meant to be kind, but there is no way to make ‘no’ nice to hear. After reading Slushkiller, one learns to empathize with the so-called “gatekeepers” of publishing.

One comment in the long response to that post has always stood out to me. It’s number 109, by someone called Madeline. She writes:

“I think I’ve got the answer to the “why do they take it so personally?” bafflement, though, or at least one good answer… I imagine that everyone reads over their [own] story and thinks, “I think this is great! People like me are going to just eat this up!” Then the rejection comes back: “There are no people like you. We’re all over here, and you’re all by yourself over there, where the wolves will be certain to pick you off first.””

The offense of rejection hurts on many levels, most obviously on the level that you who want publishing are being told you can’t have it. But the realization that Madeline describes, that this story makes profound sense to you but not to others, is emotionally isolating. Like Holly Lisle, I’m keen to avoid the too-common metaphor that a book is like a baby. Nor is a protagonist necessarily an avatar or mouthpiece for the author. But a book is, often, an expression of an author’s view of how people work, how relationships work, how the world works. When it’s rejected, one can feel painfully misunderstood, as a person.

Slushkiller is about rejection from publishers, but rejection comes also in the form of reader reactions (whether in reviews or with their wallets). I feel like I’ve come full circle, from humbly querying agents and editors to humbly peddling my published book to readers. In the month that I think I’m supposed to feel the most triumphant, I feel the most vulnerable.

Am I happy? Yes! Excited, and proud, and pleased, and nervous and self-conscious and exposed. One of the small themes in my book is that emotions don’t dilute each other. You can be “thrilled” and “wary” at the same time, and they don’t mix to create a kind of neutral state. They both just are, side by side. Nor do I believe that the negative of any two emotions is by definition the “honest” one. Often, the positive emotion is interpreted as a “brave face” covering up the “truth” of the negative one. But I don’t think that’s so. I think both can be real, together.

So here I am, in my publication month: thrilled and wary, proud and vulnerable, bold and shy. I’m happy too. Not happy all by itself, but happy along with everything else. It’s not the moment of pure, awesome triumph I imagined when I was querying. It’s a good time, in that real way that’s three-dimensional with self-doubt. It is, for all that, a celebration. It’s an open house. Come on in.

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Book Giveaway: The Divining Wand is giving away one copy of Thaisa Frank’s Heidegger’s Glasses in a random drawing to anyone who comments only on this specific post, Thaisa Frank and Heidegger’s Glasses. Comments left on other posts during the week are not entered into the contest. The deadline is Wednesday, May 19, 2010 at 7:00 p.m. EDT with the winner to be announced here in Thursday’s post. If you enter, please return on Thursday to possibly claim your book.

Thaisa Frank and Heidegger’s Glasses

May 17, 2010 By: larramiefg Category: Book Presentations, Books

HEIDEGGGER'SGLASSES
According to The New York Times, the fiction of Thaisa Frank (A Brief History in Camouflage, Sleeping in Velvet) works “by a tantalizing sense of indirection.” The critic Don Skiles has described her stories as being “in the grand tradition of the fairy tale, the legend, the spell,” while the reviewer Rob Hurwitt has called her work “domestic magical realism.” From Thaisa’s guest post, Do I Choose My Material or Does It Choose Me?, however, this acclaimed writer states: “I would say that I don’t work in the tradition of magic realism but in the tradition of surrealism.” And that is clearly what she’s done in her first novel, Heidegger’s Glasses, debuting soon. [The release has been delayed, but its new date will be noted here as soon as possible.]

Over twenty years ago, even the content of the book chose the unknowing author, as Thaisa explained in in her February 17, 2010 Red Room blog post, “The Promise of First Pages:”

The imagination is the weather of the mind.
Wallace Stevens, Adagia.

“How many of us have started promising beginnings only to have them sputter out, take wrong turns, and just refuse to go on? And how many of us say about ourselves ‘”I just can’t seem to finish things even though I start them?”‘

“Over twenty years ago, when I’d written just one collection of short stories, I heard a woman’s voice from deep below the earth. She lived in Germany during World War II and was helping people answer letters to the dead. I knew her name. I could feel her claustrophobia. I also heard some of the letters. I wrote sixteen pages and stopped because I knew this woman lived in a world with so many strands only a novel could do it justice. I could even hear the length, like a few musical notes surrounded by hours of silence. But I only knew how to write short fiction.

“I wrote other books. But the sixteen pages kept turning up in my studio, as if attached to springs. They turned up on the bookshelf. They turned up in a tax pile. They turned up under my printer. They even turned up inside a flyer from my son’s school–a long flyer, pleading for ecologically-packed lunches. They began to feel like a letter from the woman in the mine, asking me to tell her story. The paper grew more brittle and the typewriter print more antiquated. From time to time I saw her writing in a large room with other people. I always read the sixteen pages. I felt drawn to them. But I always put them away.

“A few years ago, someone at a Christmas party told me that the philosopher Martin Heidegger once had a revelation that was caused by his own eyeglasses. As soon as I heard this, I saw the title Heidegger’s Glasses and knew I was going to write a novel. I had no idea what it would be about; but I was sure it involved World War II. I didn’t think about those sixteen pages until I’d written the novel and received the galleys. Then I found them–again on invisible springs–as if they were determined to remind me that they were the origin of the book. I read them over and realized they were a DNA of almost everything that became Heidegger’s Glasses. I also realized that even though they were about an imaginary world, the world was launched by real events in World War II. I didn’t know about these events when I wrote those pages. I only found out about them afterwards, when I began to write the novel.” Please read more….

Thaisa Frank’s imagination, research and writing evolved into this synopsis:

A love affair larger than a World War.
A fairy tale with atrocities.
And it all begins with one single letter….

Heidegger’s Glasses is the startling, surreal debut novel from critically acclaimed author Thaisa Frank. The Third Reich’s obsession with the occult has led them to create the Compound of Scribes. Concealed in a converted mine shaft complete with rose-colored cobblestone streets and a continuously shifting artificial sky, the Scribes’ sole mission is to answer letters written to the dead—thereby preventing the deceased from pestering psychics for answers and inadvertently exposing the Final Solution.

As Germany falls apart at its seams, a letter arrives written by eminent philosopher Martin Heidegger to his optometrist and friend, a man now lost in the dying thralls at Auschwitz. The presence of Heidegger’s words—one simple letter in a place filled with letters—sparks a series of events that will ultimately threaten the safety and wellbeing of the entire Compound.

Part love story and part historical fiction, Heidegger’s Glasses evocatively reconstructs the landscape of Nazi Germany from an entirely original and haunting vantage point.

Much like a Grimm fairy tale, Heideggger’s Glasses has garnered Advance Praise, including fellow authors:


“This is stunning work, full of mystery and strange tenderness. Thaisa Frank has written one of the most compelling stories of the Nazi regime since D.M. Thomas’s Pictures at an Exhibition. It is a book that will haunt you.”
—DAN CHAON, AUTHOR OF AWAIT YOUR REPLY

“Thaisa Frank has composed a mesmeric image of prisoners trapped in the madness of a decaying Nazi regime. Ms. Frank’s skillfully laced prose and riveting imagery combine to create an unforgettably surrealistic portrait of a world gorged on insanity.”
—THOMAS STEINBECK, AUTHOR OF DOWN TO A SOUNDLESS SEA


Also there is an Excerpt from Heidegger’s Glasses.

Although history was one of my college majors, I handled the delivery of Heidegger’s Glasses Uncorrected Proof with wariness. Glowing words for a tale that included the Reich, Auschwitz, Hitler, Mengele, Goebbels, SS leader Henrich Himmler were bound to be hauntingly depressing. But then I remembered anecdotal “stories” of Germany housing fluently linguistic scribes to write letters for the dead. Hitler’s reliance on astrology and the occult were facts, yet the idea of these scribes being saved from death to write for the dead sounded too ironic as well as absurd. Now could it have been true?

Writing brilliantly and mystically, Thaisa Frank has brought the scribes’ story to life and, though fictionalized, it rings true. Honest, sobering, and fairy tale hopeful, this is historical fiction at its best by acknowledging the humanity amidst the insanity of Hitler’s Germany during the end of World War 11.

The woman’s voice — that Thaisa first heard over twenty years ago — is Elie Schacten, considered to be an “angel.” Whether providing for the scribes and/or attempting to save as many innocent lives as possible, Elie is the mystery of the tale. Yet who is she, really?

Thoroughly engrossing Heidegger’s Glasses is mindful of how our present needs to be aware of our past. Thaisa Frank’s debut novel is something special, deserving to be on everyone’s TBR list — hopefully on high school required reading too. Please remember that the release date has been changed…yet your patience will be rewarded once the book becomes available.

Book Giveaway: The Divining Wand is giving away one copy of Thaisa Frank’s Heidegger’s Glasses in a random drawing to anyone who comments only on this specific post. Comments left on other posts during the week are not entered into the contest. The deadline is Wednesday, May 19, 2010 at 7:00 p.m. EDT with the winner to be announced here in Thursday’s post. If you enter, please return on Thursday to possibly claim your book.

Guest Barrie Summy on Her Middle Grade School Fans

May 13, 2010 By: larramiefg Category: Guest Posts

[Barrie Summy (I So Don’t Do Mysteries, I So Don’t Do Spooky Ages 9 – 12) added to her Sherry Baldwin mystery series when I So Don’t Do Makeup was released Tuesday, May 11, 2010. And, although the author does bookstore readings/signings, she also visits middle grade schools. In today’s guest post, Barrie shares what inquiring tween readers want to know.]

First off, thank you, Larramie, for inviting me to guest post. I always enjoy a visit with you!

With I SO DON’T DO MAKEUP just out on May 11, I have several school visits planned for over the next few of weeks. Even my first Skype visit! Ack.

BarriieclassWhat can I tell you about school visits? They’re very, very fun! Some of the most interesting people in the world hang out at schools! It feels very grown up to get to go in the teachers’ lounge.

So, what kinds of questions do I get when I’m at a school? Well, a little of this and a little of that. Let me share some with you.

Question: What was your favorite book growing up?
Answer: I totally wimp out on this because I can never limit myself to just one book. My favorite picture book was AND TO THINK THAT I SAW IT ON MULBERRY STREET by Dr. Seuss. I loved loved loved Nancy Drew. I was especially partial to THE HIDDEN STAIRSCASE and THE PASSWORD TO LARKSPUR LANE. My other favorite book was A TREE GROWS IN BROOKLYN by Betty Smith.

Question: Can you count to ten in French? [Note: Barrie was born and raised in Canada.]
Answer: un, deux, trois, quatre, cinq, six, sept, huit, neuf, dix.

Question: If you could be a character in one of your books, who would you be?
Answer: Probably Sherry so that I could be the star and solve the mystery. Plus, she’s braver than me. Although I wouldn’t mind having perfect hair like Amber. And I’d kind of like to be super smart like Junie. But if I HAVE to choose just one, it’s Sherry.

Question: What is your favorite color?
Answer: It was green for years, but I think it’s changing to purple.

Question: Could you please write a book called I SO DON’T DO ROMANCE or I SO DON’T DO SPORTS?
Answer: Seriously, these are the two most common book titles students suggest. Something else I’ve noticed: fourth graders make more title suggestions than any other group.

Question: Is Josh in the next book?
Answer: Yes

Question: Could you please use my name in one of your books? But don’t make me a pet or a villain.
Answer: Maybe. I hear some great names at schools. And would you possibly be open to having your name used for a cute puppy as opposed to a snake?

Question: What do you do when you get writer’s block?
Answer: Change. If I’m writing at home, I go to the coffee shop or library. I take a break from writing and hop on the treadmill or go on a walk with Dorothy the Dog. The whole time, I repeat to myself, “Do not panic. Do not panic.”

School visits are a two-way street. The kids ask me questions. I ask them questions. I like to know what they’re reading in their spare time. What they’re reading in class. What books they like; what books they don’t like. Who’s interested in becoming a writer. How the writing program works at their school. I’m quite the nosy visitor!

When I first started doing school visits, I was nervous. Now I just look forward to them!

***Author Barrie Summy is hosting a giveaway of her fun mystery series! One BarrieGPGrand Prize winner will receive autographed copies of the three books in the series, I SO DON’T DO MAKEUP, I SO DON’T DO SPOOKY, and I SO DON’T DO MYSTERIES, plus a tote bag and t-shirt! Three lucky runners up will win an autographed copy of I SO DON’T DO MAKEUP and a t-shirt!

To enter, send an email to ISoDontDoMakeup@gmail.com (note: no apostrophe!) with the subject line “Pick Me!” In the body of the email, include your name and email address (if you’re under 13, submit a parent’s name and email address).

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Announcement: What a wonderful turnout for these two book giveaways and I truly wish you all could win, however… THE winner of Meredith Cole’s Dead in the Water is Lillie H (AliseOnLife).

AND

The Book Vixen is the winner of Joëlle Anthony’s Restoring Harmony. Congratulations!

Now if you’ll both please email: diviningwand (at) gmail (dot) com with your mailing address, the books will be sent out promptly.